MMM3513: Evangelism; 3 Cr.

Prof. Dale Irvin                       dirvin@nyts.edu

July 1 – August 26

 

The word “evangelism” first entered the English language in the seventeenth century, at a time when “-isms” were being created right and left.  The word comes from the Greek εύαγγέλιον (“euangelion”), which simply means “good news.”  What does the good news of “evangelism” mean now in the twenty-first century?  How is it practiced in a global city and in a global world, in both world Christian (ecumenical) and world religious (wider ecumenical) contexts?  What are relevant and appropriate outcomes of practices of evangelism in our contemporary world, and how can these be measured or assessed?  What is the difference, if any, between evangelism and proselytism?  These are some of the questions we will be grappling with in this course. 

 

Given the NYTS institutional context as a school of theological education with a historic commitment to the city, the course will assume that most, but not necessarily all, participants will be working within an urban or cross-cultural context.  Such issues will figure prominently in our discussions.  We will also assume that most, but not necessarily all participants in the class will be Christian.  We will thus pay attention not only to the meaning of evangelism in a non-religious context, but evangelism when practiced in the context of other Christian communions and other religions.  Participants in the class will be invited to explore the questions in light of their own confessional, theological, or faith identity (Methodist, Pentecostal, Baptist, Catholic, Anglican, Non-Denominational, Post-Denominational, Jewish, Muslim, or Buddhist), keeping in view their concrete relationship with others against the background of our widest ecumenical horizons.

MPC2743:  Crisis Counseling: 3 Cr.

(Face to Face): Sat. July 15, 22 (8:30am-4:30pm) Rm. 411 (Moodle): July 17, 19, 24, 26, 31

MPC2743: Crisis Counseling: 3 Cr.

Prof. Ronald Baard        baard.ron@gmail.com

This class will focus on current pastoral/theological perspectives regarding crisis counseling in pastoral ministry. A range of individual and family crises (including medical crises, sudden loss, addiction, domestic violence, trauma, and physical and mental illness) will be explored through readings, discussions, case studies, in-class role-plays, and carefully selected film and video resources. A major goal here is to work towards each student’s articulation and practical application of a pastoral theology in times of crisis. Enrolled students must have access to a context for the practice of pastoral ministry

 

MMU1004: Foundations of Ministry; 4 Cr. (Yr. A, Required)
Prof. Nancy Fields
nfields@nyts.edu Rm. 430 (Break-out rooms: 418, 419 & 423)

Students will develop a critical analytical perspective on relational life in the context of the local church. Special attention will be given to the role of worship, polity and congregational history.

BBN100O: Bible 3: Second Testament; 4 Cr. (Yr. A, Required) Prerequisite: BBH101, Exegesis Practicum Prof. Efrain Agosto eagosto@nyts.edu

The enrollment key is bbn1004online

This course is an introduction to the canonical writings of the Second Testament (New Testament) with particular attention to narrative and epistolary genres. Each document of the New Testament will be surveyed for its historical background, basic structure, and overall message. Some attention will be given to reading strategies for the various genres of the New Testament.

HTU2024: Modern Church History 2; 4 Cr. (Yr. B, Required)

Prof. Dale T. Irvin dirvin@nyts.edu Rm. 330

This course introduces students to the history of Christianity in its global context from the dawn of the modern era in the 15th century through what many believe to be the end of the modern era in the 20th century. Attention is paid to the various social, political and cultural contexts in which churches have lived, as well as to the developments of theological ideas in diverse situations across the last five centuries. A significant amount of time in the course is devoted to the life and ministry of churches in North America in diverse cultural contexts. While successful completion of the required Introduction to Church History course is not a prerequisite for this course, it is advised.

EEU1004: Intro to Christian Ethics; 4 Cr. (Yr. B, Required)
Prof. Jill Schaeffer
jschaeffer@nyts.edu Rm. 330 (Break-out rooms: 316, 317 & 318)

This course is an overview of the field of Christian social ethics with some special attention paid to biomedical issues. This survey necessitates a brief examination of Christian doctrine, western religious and social thought. Our task is to discover how people, past and present, engage (d) in ethical reflection, moral reasoning, social critical analysis, and ethical action for the just resolution of social conflict. Of particular interest is an examination of the West's historic understandings of morality, ethical actions, institutions, culture, society, the "poor," the state, and how these other institutions effect modern life. Certain issues of personal morality will not be intentionally addressed in this course, such as the psychodynamic dimensions of "personal" decisionism, individualistic understandings of salvation, sanctification, truth telling, or loyalty to personal codes of morality; these equally important issues are presumed to be covered elsewhere in the curriculum. The readings are designed to challenge participants to rethink their understanding of moral community life, and to rethink the places and ways in which religious teachings, practices, and beliefs affect that life. Participants are encouraged to personally and actively engage in the painful business of ethical reflection and to commit themselves to an active life of moral struggle. In short, this course requires a bit of courage.

BBN1004: Bible 3: Second Testament; 4 Cr. (Yr. A, Required) Prerequisite: BBH101, Exegesis Practicum

Prof. Efrain Agosto eagosto@nyts.edu Rm. 411 (Break-out rooms: 416, 418 & 423)

This course is an introduction to the canonical writings of the Second Testament (New Testament) with particular attention to narrative and epistolary genres. Each document of the New Testament will be surveyed for its historical background, basic structure, and overall message. Some attention will be given to reading strategies for the various genres of the New Testament.

BBN2504: Leadership in the New Testament: Lessons from Jesus and Paul; 4 Cr. (Elective)

Prof. Efrain Agosto Rm. 411

This course studies closely the Synoptic Gospels and their depiction of the ministry of Jesus, and the Letters of Paul in order to explore leadership issues in earliest Christianity. Jesus and Paul, as the major figures of the early years of the Christian movement, pronounced words, proclaimed teachings and took actions that formed communities of faith. Implicitly and explicitly they exemplified the type of leadership that they considered necessary for ministry in their day. We will pay particular attention to the picture of leadership presented in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke as well as the leaders and practices that the Apostle Paul discusses in various ways in his letters. What such historical, literary and theological study yields in terms of understanding the role of religious leadership in the exercise of ministry today will also occupy a major portion of this course.

SSU1004: Church & Community Analysis; 4 Cr. (Yr. B, Required)
Prof. Moses Biney
mbiney@nyts.edu Rm. 330 (Break out rooms: 316, 317 & 318)

The central purpose of this course is the study of congregations in their contexts. It will explore the ways congregations interact with social/urban structures. Through lectures, discussions and ethnographic research, we will find out how congregations, particularly those in the New York metro area, minister to their neighborhoods and also how changes in the neighborhoods affect these congregations. At another level, we will also study “how to study” congregations and also study the dynamic interactions between religious institutions and their environment and ways in which social dynamics shape/inform/impact their synergistic relationships